Featured

Featured Legal Articles

When Does an Employee Start Work - Guideline Decision

When Does an Employee Start Work? Guideline Decision

The requirement that workers must have two years of continuous employment before they can bring an unfair dismissal claim means that the precise date on which they started work can be of critical importance. Precisely that issue arose in the case of a safety supervisor who unofficially began work a week before his employment by a demolition company formally commenced. The man lodged an unfair dismissal claim with an Employment Tribunal (ET) after losing his job. Following a preliminary hearing, however, his claim was rejected on the basis that he had not worked continuously for the company for two years. …

When Does an Employee Start Work? Guideline Decision Read More »

Why You Should Make A Will

No Spouse, Child or Other Dependant? You Should Still Make a Will

If you have no spouse, child or other dependant you might think there is little point in making a will. However, as a High Court case showed, any such an assumption would be seriously wrong if it takes no account of your wider family and the potential for conflict between them after you are gone. The case concerned one of 10 brothers, who had assets – principally in the form of a property portfolio – worth about £2 million but made no will before he died. Three of his nieces, acting as his personal representatives, set about liquidating his assets with …

No Spouse, Child or Other Dependant? You Should Still Make a Will Read More »

Brothers Battle It Out in Court After Their Mother Fails to Make a Will

Brothers Battle It Out in Court After Their Mother Fails to Make a Will

Failing to make a professionally drafted will is a positive invitation to family strife after you are gone. In one case, a spectacular falling out between two brothers could have been averted had their mother taken the time to consult a solicitor. The woman died intestate, with the result that her entire estate passed by default to her two sons equally. One of them moved into her home after she went into hospital and, subsequently, a nursing home. She never returned to the property and he remained living there after her death. Altogether, he enjoyed more than six years of …

Brothers Battle It Out in Court After Their Mother Fails to Make a Will Read More »

What Happens To Your Home If A Loved One Dies

Is Your Home Owned by a Loved One? What Happens if He or She Dies?

If your home is owned by a loved one you may feel secure, but you can be left in an extremely precarious position if he or she dies. As an instructive High Court ruling showed, however, the law is fully capable of coming to your aid if you received lifetime promises of a permanent roof over your head. The case concerned an overseas dignitary who had three wives. A property he owned in the UK had been occupied for over 30 years by one of them. She was not, however, bequeathed the property when he died. His son by another …

Is Your Home Owned by a Loved One? What Happens if He or She Dies? Read More »

Houses in Multiple Occupation - Breaking the Rules Will Cost You Dear

Houses in Multiple Occupation – Breaking the Rules Will Cost You Dear!

Houses in multiple occupation (HMOs) are for good reasons heavily regulated, and landlords and letting agencies that fail to measure up to required standards can expect to be hit hard in the pocket. In one case, a letting agency which had no reasonable excuse for breaking the law received a stiff financial penalty. The case concerned a two-bedroom house which, when a local authority housing officer visited, was occupied by five people, forming three separate households. The agency, which bore responsibility for managing the property, was fined £25,000 by the council for breaches of the Management of Houses in Multiple …

Houses in Multiple Occupation – Breaking the Rules Will Cost You Dear! Read More »

Scroll to Top